My-Nga Lam

<back
“When you aim high, you always end up with a better product.”

More Information +

Projects with significant contribution:

1900 Spring Road

8000 North

One Winnetka

Lincoln Park 2550

10 East Delaware

840 North Lake Shore Drive

Waldorf Astoria Chicago

The Pinnacle

1326 South Michigan

4 East Elm

The Vantage, Houston

1001 South State

Previous Firms:

Solomon Cordwell Buenz

Skidmore Owings & Merrill

Education:

Bachelor of Architecture, McGill University

My-Nga Lam

Design Principal | AIA, LEED AP, NCARB

312.414.1098

More Information +

Projects with significant contribution:

1900 Spring Road

8000 North

One Winnetka

Lincoln Park 2550

10 East Delaware

840 North Lake Shore Drive

Waldorf Astoria Chicago

The Pinnacle

1326 South Michigan

4 East Elm

The Vantage, Houston

1001 South State

Previous Firms:

Solomon Cordwell Buenz

Skidmore Owings & Merrill

Education:

Bachelor of Architecture, McGill University

I like to roll up my sleeves and come up with design solutions right alongside my team. I’m sketching, I’m drawing, I’m getting on the computer to work things out. This helps me better understand the challenges of the project. You can’t
do that unless you go through the process yourself.

When I was growing up in Canada at a young age, my father was a carpenter and I would watch him remodel homes and build fixed casework and even barns. Seeing how all the parts came together and how sometimes every space and detail was personal and unique to the homeowner left a lasting impression on me. The sense of being enclosed by something you helped to create really sparked an excitement that made me want to be in that line of work.

The way most architects approach a design is to focus on efficiency and value. But how do you balance that with what a luxury product should be? How do you start to work towards a big picture concept to create the kind of spaces and experiences that capture what it means to come home on a deeper level? How do you create a sense of a welcoming arrival yet also speak to security and privacy? These are the questions we ask ourselves.

For me, one of our biggest achievements at Lucien Lagrange Studio is that the end users know our name and our brand. It speaks to the design responding to lifestyle needs, to the timelessness of the building composition, and to the craftsmanship and human touch of the details. People find a sense of joy coming home to and living in these buildings. To have name recognition outside of the real estate industry is a big achievement.

When we’re designing, we ask questions like “How would a man come home to this space, versus how a woman would come home? How do you plan layouts for Millennials versus Empty Nesters?” We try to imagine how spaces are actually used, and that’s constantly changing. So we’re always learning and researching: talking to brokers and buyers, considering how technology is changing the way we live, and looking at other local and international markets that are pushing the envelope to expand our thinking.

There’s one piece of advice from Lucien that has really stuck in my head when I approach the design: “Aim high.” Start with the grand vision, not the constraints. Imagine how you want to experience the building and then define how to capture those moments through spaces and forms. This approach is the same whether you’re developing the exterior of the building or the layout for a bathroom. When you aim high, you always end up with a better product.

<back